Depression Articles A-Z

Acupuncture and Depression - Antidepresants

This page contains links to eMedTV Depression Articles containing information on subjects from Acupuncture and Depression to Antidepresants. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Acupuncture and Depression
    Acupuncture may be useful as a complementary treatment for depression. This eMedTV Web page gives an overview of acupuncture and depression, noting in particular that acupuncture shouldn't be used in place of conventional treatment options.
  • Alcohol and Effexor
    As this eMedTV article explains, if you choose to drink while taking Effexor, you should drink light-to-moderate amounts. This page further explores Effexor and alcohol, including what the research says about the safety of combining the two.
  • Alcohol and Lexapro
    This eMedTV segment explains that if a person decides to drink alcohol while on Lexapro, he or she should drink moderately -- one drink daily for women and two drinks daily for men. This page provides some general guidelines about alcohol and Lexapro.
  • Alcohol and Paxil CR
    If you choose to drink alcohol while on Paxil CR, you should drink only moderate amounts. This eMedTV article discusses alcohol and Paxil CR in more detail, including precautions to be aware of and a definition of what is considered moderate drinking.
  • Alcohol and Prozac
    As this eMedTV article explains, Prozac (fluoxetine) may intensify the effects of alcohol, so if you choose to drink while on Prozac, it's important to do so in moderation. This Web page offers an in-depth look at alcohol and Prozac.
  • Alcohol and Trazodone
    Alcohol and trazodone may potentially be a dangerous combination. This eMedTV page explains when it is okay to drink while taking the drug, defines "moderate drinking," and discusses the importance of communicating with your healthcare provider.
  • Alcohol and Zoloft
    As this eMedTV page explains, alcohol and Zoloft act upon similar chemicals in the brain; Zoloft can intensify the effects of alcohol. This article covers this topic in detail, including cautions you should take if you choose to drink while on Zoloft.
  • Amanda Bynes
    In the fall of 2014, Amanda Bynes announced that she had been diagnosed with both major depression and bipolar disorder, two conditions that were likely responsible for her recent episodes of erratic behavior. Bynes said she was undergoing treatment, which included hospitalization. Recent reports indicate that she left the hospital in November, and no further reports have been released lately.
  • Amatriptaline
    Amitriptyline is a prescription drug used for the treatment of depression. This eMedTV page offers a more in-depth look at amitriptyline and its uses, effects, and possible side effects. Amatriptaline is a common misspelling of amitriptyline.
  • Amitriptaline
    This eMedTV page offers an overview of amitriptyline, a prescription drug used to treat depression. This page also covers some general precautions to be aware of before using the medication. Amitriptaline is a common misspelling of amitriptyline.
  • Amitriptilin
    Amitriptyline is a drug that can be prescribed to help relieve symptoms of depression. This eMedTV article explores how the medication works and discusses other possible amitriptyline uses. Amitriptilin is a common misspelling of amitriptyline.
  • Amitriptiline
    Amitriptyline is a prescribed drug licensed to treat depression. This selection from the eMedTV Web site describes amitriptyline in more detail and offers general precautions for taking the drug. Amitriptiline is a common misspelling of amitriptyline.
  • Amitriptilyne
    This eMedTV page covers amitriptyline, a prescription drug used to treat depression. This page discusses when and how to take amitriptyline, as well as its side effects and available strengths. Amitriptilyne is a common misspelling of amitriptyline.
  • Amitriptline
    As a tricyclic antidepressant, amitriptyline may help relieve symptoms of depression. This eMedTV resource provides an overview of amitriptyline and describes some of its possible side effects. Amitriptline is a common misspelling of amitriptyline.
  • Amitriptoline
    Amitriptyline is a prescription medication approved for treating symptoms of depression. This eMedTV page covers other amitriptyline uses and lists side effects that may occur during treatment. Amitriptoline is a common misspelling of amitriptyline.
  • Amitriptylene
    A healthcare provider may prescribe amitriptyline to treat depression. This eMedTV Web page offers a brief description of amitriptyline and explains what to tell your doctor before taking it. Amitriptylene is a common misspelling of amitriptyline.
  • Amitriptylin
    Amitriptyline is a prescription medicine used for the treatment of depression. This eMedTV page takes a brief look at amitriptyline and provides a link to more detailed information on the drug. Amitriptylin is a common misspelling of amitriptyline.
  • Amitriptyline
    Amitriptyline is a prescription medication used to treat depression. This eMedTV article offers an in-depth look at amitriptyline, including information on the drug's possible side effects, available strengths, and overdose symptoms.
  • Amitriptyline 10 Mg Tablets
    As this eMedTV article explains, certain groups of people start with 10-mg amitriptyline tablets when using this product for depression. This page also lists a couple of factors that affect the amount prescribed and offers important safety tips.
  • Amitriptyline 100 Mg
    If you have depression, your healthcare provider may recommend once-daily dosing with 100-mg amitriptyline. This eMedTV article briefly explains the dosing guidelines for this antidepressant, including a link to more detailed information.
  • Amitriptyline 150 Mg
    As explained in this eMedTV page, the maximum amitriptyline dose for most people is 150 mg total daily. This article offers some basic dosing guidelines for amitriptyline and includes a link to more detailed information on how to take this medicine.
  • Amitriptyline 25 Mg Tablets
    This page from the eMedTV archives explains when 25-mg amitriptyline tablets are used, why certain people need to start with this low dose, and why it is important to be patient when first starting treatment with this antidepressant medication.
  • Amitriptyline 50 Mg Tablets
    As this eMedTV page explains, people can start with the 50-mg strength of amitriptyline tablets; however, various factors will determine the amount actually prescribed. This page takes a brief look at dosing for this drug and links to more information.
  • Amitriptyline 75 Mg
    This eMedTV resource explains that most people start with the 75-mg amitriptyline strength; however, several different factors affect the amount prescribed. This segment also includes a link to more in-depth information on dosing for this product.
  • Amitriptyline and Hair Loss
    It isn't known whether there is a relationship between amitriptyline and hair loss. But as this portion of the eMedTV archives explains, you should talk with your healthcare provider if you do experience hair loss while taking amitriptyline.
  • Amitriptyline and Pregnancy
    If you're on amitriptyline and pregnancy occurs, tell your doctor. As this eMedTV page explains, the drug caused birth defects in animal studies; and there have also been a few reports of birth defects in the babies of women who took it while pregnant.
  • Amitriptyline and Sex Drive
    As this eMedTV page explains, amitriptyline is known to cause a decrease in sex drive. This eMedTV article contains more information about this topic and explains what your doctor may recommend if you are using this drug and notice sexual side effects.
  • Amitriptyline and Suicide
    It's difficult to know for sure if there's a link between using amitriptyline and suicide. This eMedTV page lists possible signs of suicidal behavior to report to your healthcare provider right away (such as thoughts about death or committing suicide).
  • Amitriptyline and Weight Gain
    As this section of the eMedTV library explains, it's difficult to tell whether there's a relationship between amitriptyline and weight gain. If you do notice weight during treatment with amitriptyline, you should talk with your healthcare provider.
  • Amitriptyline Antidepressant
    This selection from the eMedTV archives offers a brief look at amitriptyline, an antidepressant approved for use in people age 12 and older. This segment describes how this drug may work, other conditions it can treat, and possible side effects.
  • Amitriptyline Dangers
    Most people are able to take amitriptyline safely and effectively. However, as explained in this eMedTV article, it is not suitable for everyone. This resource takes a closer look at the potential dangers of amitriptyline.
  • Amitriptyline Dosage
    This eMedTV segment explains that the starting amitriptyline dosage for people with depression is 75 mg daily, divided into smaller doses, or 50 mg to 100 mg once daily at bedtime. This page also covers some tips for taking your amitriptyline dose.
  • Amitriptyline Drug Information
    This page on the eMedTV site provides important information on amitriptyline, a drug used to treat depression. This article includes details on when and how to take it, what to tell your healthcare provider before he or she prescribes it, and more.
  • Amitriptyline Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV resource explores how amitriptyline drug interactions can raise the risk of side effects like drowsiness, dizziness, or suicidal thoughts. Barbiturates and alcohol are among the drugs that can potentially interact with amitriptyline.
  • Amitriptyline Drug Side Effects
    Common negative reactions to amitriptyline include dizziness, drowsiness, and confusion. This eMedTV page describes other possible side effects of the drug, including serious problems that can occur during treatment with amitriptyline.
  • Amitriptyline for Children
    Amitriptyline is not approved for use in people under the age of 12. This selection from the eMedTV site offers more information on using amitriptyline in children, including details on how this drug may lead to suicidal thoughts and behaviors.
  • Amitriptyline for Depression
    If you have depression, your healthcare provider may prescribe amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant. This article takes a quick look at using amitriptyline for depression and explains how it is sometimes used "off-label" to treat other conditions.
  • Amitriptyline for Migraines
    As this eMedTV article explains, amitriptyline can be used "off-label" to prevent migraines. This page explores the use of this antidepressant for migraine prevention, including how it works and why it may take a few weeks for the drug to start working.
  • Amitriptyline for Pain
    If you have certain types of pain, your doctor may recommend using amitriptyline. This eMedTV page explains how using amitriptyline may help relieve symptoms associated with nerve-related causes (such as shingles) and symptoms of fibromyalgia.
  • Amitriptyline HCI
    Amitriptyline is a prescription drug commonly used to treat depression. This eMedTV page explains how this drug works, when and how to take it, and off-label uses. Amitriptyline HCI is a common misspelling and variation of amitriptyline.
  • Amitriptyline Hydrochloride (HCl) Medicine
    This eMedTV page describes one of the many drugs used to treat depression: amitriptyline hydrochloride (HCl). This medicine is explored briefly in this selection, with a look at how it works and who can take it, and includes a link to learn more.
  • Amitriptyline Indications
    Amitriptyline is a prescription medicine used for the treatment of depression. This eMedTV Web resource lists possible off-label indications for amitriptyline and explains how long it may take before depression symptoms improve with this drug.
  • Amitriptyline Medication Information
    This eMedTV page offers some basic information on amitriptyline, a medication used to treat depression. This article explains what to discuss with your healthcare provider before taking it, lists common side effects, and provides a link to more details.
  • Amitriptyline Oral
    This eMedTV article explains that the oral drug amitriptyline is typically taken one to three times daily. This page describes the factors that affect a person's dose, as well as the amount prescribed, and the condition this product is approved to treat.
  • Amitriptyline Overdose
    Symptoms of an overdose with amitriptyline can include fever, vomiting, agitation, and even loss of life. This eMedTV page discusses possible overdose symptoms and treatment options, and also explains what to do if you have taken too much amitriptyline.
  • Amitriptyline Risks
    Amitriptyline can cause dry mouth and make schizophrenia, glaucoma, and bladder problems worse. This eMedTV selection discusses some of the other risks associated with amitriptyline, including information on what can happen if you take too much.
  • Amitriptyline Safety
    Amitriptyline, like all antidepressants, may increase the risk of suicidal thoughts or behavior. This eMedTV resource provides other safety concerns with amitriptyline, including potential side effects and problems that may require medical attention.
  • Amitriptyline Sexual Side Effects
    Sexual side effects like impotence or a decreased sex drive may occur in some people taking amitriptyline. This eMedTV segment explains that if during treatment with amitriptyline, sexual side effects occur, you should talk with your doctor.
  • Amitriptyline Side Effects
    Common amitriptyline side effects can include confusion, constipation, and dry mouth. This eMedTV Web page also lists possible withdrawal side effects with amitriptyline (such as nausea) and side effects to report to your doctor (such as seizures).
  • Amitriptyline Strengths
    There are several strengths of amitriptyline available, ranging from 10 mg to 150 mg tablets. This eMedTV resource describes some of the factors that your doctor will consider when prescribing a dosage, such as your age and medications you are taking.
  • Amitriptyline Substitute
    As this eMedTV page explains, depression and anxiety can be treated with medications other than amitriptyline. Substitutes such as other drugs and talk therapies are briefly described in this segment, including when such alternatives may be considered.
  • Amitriptyline Tablets
    Amitriptyline is a prescription medicine used to treat depression. This eMedTV page takes a closer look at amitriptyline tablets, explaining the different strengths and what to expect during treatment. A link to more information is also included.
  • Amitriptyline Uses
    As this part of the eMedTV archives explains, amitriptyline is licensed to treat depression. This page also explores several off-label amitriptyline uses, such as treating bedwetting, helping people quit smoking, and preventing migraines.
  • Amitriptyline Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV page covers amitriptyline warnings and precautions, such as potential drug interactions; the safety of taking amitriptyline if you have a history of seizures, bladder problems, or glaucoma; and people who shouldn't take the drug at all.
  • Amitriptyline Weight Change
    This eMedTV Web page explains that a weight change with amitriptyline is possible -- most people experience an increase rather than a decrease. This page explains how to maintain a healthy weight while on this drug and links to more information.
  • Amitriptylline
    As this eMedTV article explains, a doctor may prescribe amitriptyline to treat depression. This Web page also explains other amitriptyline uses and provides a link to more detailed information. Amitriptylline is a common misspelling of amitriptyline.
  • Amitripyline
    Amitriptyline is a prescription medicine that is licensed to treat depression. This part of the eMedTV library explains how amitriptyline may work, and describes possible signs of an overdose. Amitripyline is a common misspelling of amitriptyline.
  • Amitryptaline
    This eMedTV segment explains that amitriptyline is a prescription medication that is used to treat depression. This page also covers general dosing guidelines and possible overdose symptoms. Amitryptaline is a common misspelling of amitriptyline.
  • Amitryptilin
    Amitriptyline is a prescription antidepressant. This eMedTV resource describes amitriptyline in more detail, explains how to take the drug, and lists some of its potential side effects. Amitryptilin is a common misspelling of amitriptyline.
  • Amitryptiline
    This eMedTV segment discusses amitriptyline, a prescription drug used for treating depression. This page covers the medication's strengths, off-label uses, and overdose symptoms. Amitryptiline is a common misspelling of amitriptyline.
  • Amitryptyline
    Amitriptyline, a prescription drug used to treat depression, is a type of tricyclic antidepressant. This eMedTV page provides an overview of the drug and offers some general dosing guidelines. Amitryptyline is a common misspelling of amitriptyline.
  • Amtriptyline
    Amitriptyline is a prescription medicine used for treating depression. This eMedTV segment explains what else amitriptyline is used for and describes the effects of the medication. Amtriptyline is a common misspelling of amitriptyline.
  • Amytriptaline
    Amitriptyline is a prescription drug licensed to treat depression. This eMedTV Web page explores how amitriptyline may work and lists some of the potential side effects of the medication. Amytriptaline is a common misspelling of amitriptyline.
  • Amytriptiline
    Amitriptyline is a drug used to treat depression. This eMedTV Web page covers when and how to take the medication, factors that can affect your dosage, and available strengths. Amytriptiline is a common misspelling of amitriptyline.
  • Amytriptyline
    As this eMedTV segment explains, amitriptyline is a prescription drug used for treating depression. This page covers amitriptyline side effects, overdose symptoms, and available strengths. Amytriptyline is a common misspelling of amitriptyline.
  • Amytripyline
    This eMedTV page examines amitriptyline, a drug licensed to treat depression. This page covers the drug's side effects and strengths, as well as things to tell your doctor about before taking it. Amytripyline is a common misspelling of amitriptyline.
  • An Exercise Buddy
    This presentation has already mentioned some of the benefits just walking a dog can offer, but let's not forget one of the most obvious ones. Walking your dog is good for both of you -- physically and mentally! Aim for 30 minutes a day every day, although needs will vary from dog to dog. Start out with short distances if you have a puppy and gradually increase the length of the walk. Doing too much too soon can put too much stress on joints not accustomed to such exercise.
  • Anitdepressants
    Antidepressants are medications that are often used in depression treatment. This eMedTV article describes the various types of antidepressants available and explains how they work. Anitdepressants is a common misspelling of antidepressants.
  • Anti Depresants
    Antidepressants are prescription drugs mainly used for treating depression. This eMedTV page explains how these drugs work and lists the different types of antidepressants that are available. Anti depresants is a common misspelling of antidepressants.
  • Anti Depressants
    Antidepressants are prescription medications approved to treat depression. This eMedTV segment lists various types of antidepressants and describes potential side effects of these drugs. Anti depressants is a common misspelling of antidepressants.
  • Anti Depressents
    Antidepressants are medications that can be prescribed to treat depression. This eMedTV article lists various types of antidepressants and explains what you should know before taking them. Anti depressents is a common misspelling of antidepressants.
  • Anti-Depressant
    In most cases, antidepressants are used for treating depression. This page from the eMedTV Web site offers more information on antidepressants and their uses and potential side effects. Anti-depressant is a common misspelling of antidepressants.
  • Anticipate Holiday Troubles
    The holidays are supposed to be jolly times, but for many people, they are a source of sadness, anger, or other less-than-festive emotions. If this is an annual problem for you, plan ahead of time for ways to brighten the season for yourself. Giving back to your community (there are usually ample opportunities during the holidays) can be very helpful. Connecting with others through a place of worship, a book club, or other similar gatherings can be helpful for those fighting loneliness. Take time to pamper yourself, and remind yourself of the small joys of the season.
  • Antidepessants
    Antidepressants are drugs that are prescribed to treat depression symptoms. This part of the eMedTV site describes antidepressants in more detail and lists some of their possible side effects. Antidepessants is a common misspelling of antidepressants.
  • Antideppresants
    Doctors often prescribe antidepressants to help with depression treatment. This eMedTV page describes how these drugs work and provides a list of various types of antidepressants available. Antideppresants is a common misspelling of antidepressants.
  • Antideppressant
    Antidepressants are mainly used for treating depression but can also be used to treat other conditions. This eMedTV segment lists various types of antidepressants that are available today. Antideppressant is a common misspelling of antidepressants.
  • Antideppressants
    Antidepressants are medications that are approved for treating depression. This eMedTV segment lists some types of antidepressants and describes the side effects associated with these drugs. Antideppressants is a common misspelling of antidepressants.
  • Antidepresant
    Antidepressants are used for the treatment of depression. This eMedTV page lists newer and older types of antidepressants and explains whether side effects are likely to occur with these drugs. Antidepresant is a common misspelling of antidepressants.
  • Antidepresants
    Antidepressants are depression medications that are available by prescription. This eMedTV Web page covers what you should know before taking antidepressants and explains how these drugs work. Antidepresants is a common misspelling of antidepressants.
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