Depression Articles A-Z

Generic Parnate - Lexapro and Weight Loss

This page contains links to eMedTV Depression Articles containing information on subjects from Generic Parnate to Lexapro and Weight Loss. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Generic Parnate
    Parnate is currently available as a generic -- Tranylcypromine 10 mg tablets. This page of the eMedTV Web site describes generic Parnate in more detail and explains how the generic medicine compares to the brand-name version.
  • Generic Paroxetine
    As this eMedTV segment explains, generic paroxetine is currently available in several strengths. This article also describes how generic medications (including generic paroxetine) have to undergo certain tests to compare them to brand-name drugs.
  • Generic Paxil CR
    As explained in this selection from the eMedTV site, generic Paxil CR is now available. This article offers an in-depth look at the generic version, including information on how it compares to the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Pexeva
    As explained in this selection from the eMedTV Web site, you cannot buy generic Pexeva (paroxetine mesylate) at this time. This article explains why and discusses when a generic version of the medicine may become available.
  • Generic Pristiq
    Pristiq is not available in generic form at this time. This segment from the eMedTV archives explains when generic Pristiq products may become available and discusses the difference between a generic drug and its "generic name."
  • Generic Prozac
    Prozac is an antidepressant that is currently available as a generic. This section of the eMedTV site describes generic Prozac capsules, tablets, and liquid in more detail and lists the various strengths that are available for each form.
  • Generic Remeron
    This eMedTV page provides a detailed discussion on generic Remeron, including the available strengths and forms. This page also explains that its "AB" rating from the FDA means that the generic form is considered equivalent to the brand-name version.
  • Generic Sinequan
    Generic Sinequan is available as capsules and in a liquid form. This section of the eMedTV site lists the various strengths available for generic Sinequan drugs, describes the quality of these drugs, and offers information on their manufacturers.
  • Generic Viibryd
    At this time, Viibryd (vilazodone) is not available in generic form. As this selection from the eMedTV site explains, the earliest predictable date that a generic version could become available is when the drug's first patent expires in ******.
  • Generic Wellbutrin
    As this eMedTV page explains, generic Wellbutrin comes in the form of 150-mg and 300-mg tablets. This article also explains how the FDA has assigned the generic versions an "AB" rating, meaning that they are equivalent to brand-name Wellbutrin.
  • Generic Wellbutrin SR
    Generic Wellbutrin SR is sold under the names Bupropion SR tablets and Budeprion SR tablets. As this page on the eMedTV site explains, the FDA has determined that the generic versions of Wellbutrin SR are equivalent to the brand name drug.
  • Generic Wellbutrin XL
    This page of the eMedTV Web site explains that generic Wellbutrin XL is currently sold under the name Budeprion XL. This page also describes how the FDA rates generic medications and why this generic medication was given an "AB" rating.
  • Generic Zoloft
    Generic Zoloft is available under the name Sertraline and is made by several different companies. This eMedTV Web page looks at the similarities and differences between the generic version of Zoloft and the brand-name drug.
  • Get Healthy
    If it's good for your body, it will probably help alleviate winter blues. Making a few changes to your diet and adding a bit of exercise to your day can work wonders. However, a drastic dietary change, such as suffering through a restrictive diet during the holidays, can backfire, especially if you fail to keep to the diet. Make small changes that you can live with, and let the benefits start adding up.
  • Get Outside
    This simple step helps in at least two ways. It provides a little sunshine and usually helps you get a little exercise. Shovel the sidewalk, take a walk, or, if you're feeling more adventurous, go skiing or sledding.
  • Get Your Blood Flowing
    You've probably heard it a thousand times, but that's because it's incredibly true! Exercise is the NUMBER ONE way to quickly and easily improve your mood -- if, and that's a big "if" -- it's done right. Many people who start a new exercise program try to do too much, too quickly and get frustrated. Instead, start slowly and simply. Mornings are the best time to exercise, so begin your day with a few minutes of activity. Shoot for five minutes of exercise at first -- whatever works best for you. Jumping jacks, push-ups, and deep knee bends are great exercises to get your blood flowing. Even more important, you can do them just about anywhere. If possible, do them the second you get out of bed! Keep in mind that if you have a health condition that might make physical activity dangerous, be sure to talk to your doctor before starting any new exercise program. If not, then get started tomorrow!
  • Hair Loss From Celexa
    In rare cases, people taking Celexa may experience hair loss. As this eMedTV segment explains, hair loss occurs in 1 in 100 to 1 in 1,000 people who take the medication. This article explains what to do if hair loss occurs while taking this drug.
  • How Do Healthcare Providers Test for Depression?
    This segment of the eMedTV archives explains that there are no medical tests used to diagnose depression, so the condition is identified through other ways. This page explains the diagnostic process and also lists some of the symptoms of depression.
  • How Does Amitriptyline Work?
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, amitriptyline is thought to work by affecting several chemicals in the brain. When the levels of these chemicals become unbalanced, it can cause conditions such as depression. A link to more details is also included.
  • How Does Celexa Work?
    As this article from the eMedTV Web site explains, Celexa works by balancing serotonin levels in the brain. When the levels of this chemical become unbalanced, it can cause many conditions, including depression. A link to more detail is also included.
  • How Does Nortriptyline Work?
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, nortriptyline is thought to work by affecting several chemicals in the brain. When the levels of these chemicals become unbalanced, it can cause conditions such as depression. A link to more details is also included.
  • How Does Pristiq Work?
    As explained in this page from the eMedTV library, Pristiq works in the brain to balance the levels of serotonin and norepinephrine. This article takes a closer look at how the antidepressant works and provides a link to more information.
  • How Does Prozac Work?
    As this eMedTV page explains, Prozac works to treat conditions such as depression by affecting a certain chemical in the brain. This page further discusses how Prozac treats various conditions that are caused by an imbalance of serotonin levels.
  • How Does Trazodone Work?
    It is not entirely clear how trazodone works. However, as this eMedTV selection explains, the drug is believed to have an effect on serotonin, a chemical in the brain. This Web page takes a closer look at this topic and provides a link to more details.
  • How Long Will My Depression Last?
    Depression affects everyone differently, and how long it lasts depends on various factors. As this eMedTV page explains, these factors include the type of depression you have and its severity. Treatment may last up to nine months, or possibly for life.
  • Imipramine Pamoate
    Imipramine pamoate is a prescription drug used to treat adult depression. This eMedTV article provides detailed information on imipramine pamoate uses, effects, possible side effects, general dosing guidelines, and strengths.
  • Imipramine Pamoate (Tofranil PM)
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV Web library, imipramine pamoate (Tofranil PM) is a medication used to treat depression. This article provides more information on this prescription drug, including who can take it and what to expect.
  • Imipramine Pamoate Dosing
    Imipramine pamoate dosing for depression treatment typically starts at 75 mg once daily. As this eMedTV resource explains, dosages can be increased up to 300 mg a day if needed. This article also lists some tips on taking the medication.
  • Imipramine Pamoate Side Effects
    Confusion, drowsiness, and constipation are a few side effects of imipramine pamoate. This eMedTV segment lists other possible imipramine pamoate side effects, including serious side effects that require medical attention (such as seizures).
  • Imsam
    Emsam is a prescription drug that is licensed to treat depression. This portion of the eMedTV library describes some of the potential side effects of the medication and offers some precautions for the drug. Imsam is a common misspelling of Emsam.
  • Information on Antidepressants
    Antidepressants can be used to treat depression, panic disorder, and other conditions. This eMedTV page explores antidepressants in more detail, with information on the various types and why it's important to work closely with your healthcare provider.
  • Information on Paxil CR
    This eMedTV Web page provides some basic drug information on Paxil CR, a drug used to treat panic disorder and other conditions. Topics included in this article include who can use it, possible side effects, and issues to discuss with your doctor.
  • Is Depression Different for Men? What Are the Signs of Depression in Men?
    Although men and women experience the same symptoms of depression, this eMedTV resource explains that they can experience these signs differently. For example, men are more likely to report changes in activity and less likely to seek help.
  • Is My Teen Depressed?
    Some parents may ask, "Is my teen depressed?" This eMedTV page lists things you can do if your child is depressed (such as taking notes about behaviors that concern you), as well as things you shouldn't do (like asking your child to "snap out of it").
  • Isocarboxazid
    Isocarboxazid is a prescription drug that is used to treat depression. This eMedTV resource explains why this product is usually used as a last resort. This page also describes how it works and provides tips for taking the medicine.
  • Isocarboxazid (Marplan)
    If you have depression, you may have heard about isocarboxazid (Marplan). This eMedTV Web resource takes a quick look at this prescription medicine, with details on what to expect and how to reduce your risk of problems.
  • Isocarboxazid Dosing
    Isocarboxazid dosing for depression usually starts at 10 mg twice daily. This portion of the eMedTV Web site discusses isocarboxazid dosing guidelines in more detail and outlines some suggestions for when and how to take the medication.
  • Jon Hamm
    Mad Men star Jon Hamm is no stranger to chronic depression. Like others, he treated it with antidepressants and therapy. What he appreciated the most about therapy, Hamm says, is that "it gives you another perspective when you are so lost in your own spiral." Depression is due to a chemical imbalance in the brain, and antidepressants help restore that balance, something else Hamm acknowledges.
  • Katy Perry
    Pop star Katy Perry is another young celeb who has publicly revealed her battles with depression. After her divorce from actor/comedian Russell Brand, Perry admitted that she was severely depressed and even contemplated suicide. The lyrics to her song "By the Grace of God" echo this, and she wrote the song in the hope that it would inspire others who are also struggling.
  • Kendra Wilkinson
    Television personality Kendra Wilkinson might have felt all alone when she began having symptoms of postpartum depression; however, 10 to 15 percent of women experience this condition. Symptoms can include strong feelings of helplessness, guilt, or anger and an inability to care for oneself or one's baby. Prompt treatment is vital, of course, and it needs to continue even after a woman starts to feel better to prevent a relapse.
  • L-Tyrosine
    L-tyrosine is a naturally occurring amino acid that is also available in supplement form. This eMedTV segment provides a detailed overview of L-tyrosine, including information on its safety and effectiveness, possible side effects, and more.
  • L-Tyrosine Dosing
    When taking L-tyrosine, dosing guidelines on your product label should be followed. This eMedTV page explains why this is the case and offers general information and tips on how to take your L-tyrosine dose safely and how to find a reputable product.
  • L-Tyrosine Safety
    Because certain people should not take L-tyrosine, safety precautions and warnings are included in this eMedTV Web page. This includes things to be aware of before taking the supplement, as well as guidelines on choosing a reputable manufacturer.
  • L-Tyrosine Side Effects
    Although not everyone will have side effects with L-tyrosine, problems can still occur. This eMedTV page lists some of the most common side effects, as well as potentially serious ones. This page also discusses what you should do if side effects occur.
  • L-Tyrosine Supplement Information
    This eMedTV Web article features information on L-tyrosine, a supplement that is taken to treat depression and other conditions. Topics covered in this selection include side effects, safety warnings, and more.
  • Laxapro
    This eMedTV page gives an overview of Lexapro, a drug used to treat depression and generalized anxiety disorder. This page describes how Lexapro works and explains what to do if you overdose on the drug. Laxapro is a common misspelling of Lexapro.
  • Leave the House
    While time spent outdoors is probably most effective, simply getting out of the house (for instance, to shop or visit the local library) can lift your mood. Don't let the weather stop you, except in true cases where transportation or travel is unsafe.
  • Lexapo
    This eMedTV Web article explains how Lexapro works to treat depression and generalized anxiety disorder. This page also describes side effects of Lexapro and factors that may affect your dosage. Lexapo is a common misspelling of Lexapro.
  • Lexapor
    Lexapro is a medication that is often prescribed to treat depression and generalized anxiety disorder. As this eMedTV page explains, Lexapro comes in several strengths and has several possible side effects. Lexapor is a common misspelling of Lexapro.
  • Lexapril
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Lexapro to treat depression or generalized anxiety disorder. This eMedTV resource explores some side effects of Lexapro and offers some general dosing information. Lexapril is a common misspelling of Lexapro.
  • Lexapro
    Generalized anxiety disorder and depression are often treated with Lexapro. This segment of the eMedTV Web site further describes this prescription drug and its other uses, as well as dosing information, side effects, strengths, and more.
  • Lexapro 10 mg Tablets
    Most people being treated for depression or GAD typically start with Lexapro 10 mg tablets. This eMedTV resource explains what other forms and strengths are available for this medication and provides more detailed Lexapro dosing guidelines.
  • Lexapro 20 mg Tablets
    Most people being treated for depression or GAD end up taking Lexapro 20 mg tablets or 10 mg tablets. This eMedTV segment offers more dosing information and explains how dosing with Lexapro works for elderly people and people with liver problems.
  • Lexapro 5 mg Tablets
    People with liver problems treating depression or GAD may start with Lexapro 5 mg tablets. This eMedTV page also includes dosing guidelines for people without liver problems and explains what the maximum recommended dose is for elderly people.
  • Lexapro Alternatives
    This eMedTV page explains that there are numerous Lexapro alternatives for treating both depression and anxiety. This page lists some alternatives to this drug for the treatment of depression, which can include therapy and other antidepressant drugs.
  • Lexapro and Breastfeeding
    As this part of the eMedTV archives explains, a doctor may prescribe Lexapro to a woman who is breastfeeding if he or she decides that the benefits outweigh the possible risks. If you have concerns about Lexapro and breastfeeding, talk to your doctor.
  • Lexapro and Burning Sensation
    As this eMedTV page explains, 2 percent of people on Lexapro have burning sensations described as tingling or numbness, skin crawling, or itching. If you're taking Lexapro and burning sensations occur, you should contact your doctor.
  • Lexapro and Decreased Appetite
    Side effects may occur with Lexapro, and decreased appetite is one of them. This eMedTV Web page provides more detail on this side effect, which occurs just as often in those taking the drug for depression as it does in those taking it for anxiety.
  • Lexapro and Dry Mouth
    If you are taking Lexapro and dry mouth occurs, you can sip water more often or during meals. This eMedTV page offers other tips on dealing with dry mouth, such as avoiding drinks with caffeine, using a humidifier at night, and chewing sugarless gum.
  • Lexapro and Hair Loss
    Some people taking Lexapro may experience side effects, including the loss of hair. This eMedTV resource explains that you should talk with your healthcare provider if hair loss does occur while you're taking Lexapro.
  • Lexapro and Impotence
    Occurring in up to 3 percent of men who take Lexapro, impotence is one of the drug's common side effects. This eMedTV Web page defines impotence and explains that if you're taking Lexapro and impotence occurs, you should talk with your doctor.
  • Lexapro and Insomnia
    Some people have side effects with Lexapro, and insomnia is among the most common. This eMedTV page discusses how common insomnia is in people taking this drug and lists tips for dealing with insomnia -- such as keeping a regular sleep-wake cycle.
  • Lexapro and Migraine Headaches
    In some cases, a healthcare provider may prescribe Lexapro to help prevent migraines. This part of the eMedTV library takes an in-depth look at Lexapro and migraine headaches, including information on when a doctor may prescribe Lexapro for this use.
  • Lexapro and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV page lists symptoms seen in some fetuses exposed to Lexapro during pregnancy (including seizures, tremors, and constant crying) and explains that you should talk with your healthcare provider if you're taking Lexapro and pregnancy occurs.
  • Lexapro and Suicide
    This eMedTV page explains that you should talk to your doctor if you have any possible signs of suicidal behavior (like insomnia or suicide attempts), whether or not you're taking Lexapro. This page also covers previous studies on suicide and Lexapro.
  • Lexapro and Weight Gain
    Up to 5 percent of people on Lexapro may experience weight gain. This eMedTV page explains that if you're taking Lexapro and weight gain occurs, you can help it by getting regular physical activity and limiting your alcohol intake, among other things.
  • Lexapro and Weight Loss
    As this eMedTV segment explains, weight loss is a rare Lexapro side effect. This article discusses how often this side effect occurs and explains that you should talk to your healthcare provider if you notice weight loss while on the drug.
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