Depression Articles A-Z

Prozac and Weight Gain - Remeron and Breastfeeding

This page contains links to eMedTV Depression Articles containing information on subjects from Prozac and Weight Gain to Remeron and Breastfeeding. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Prozac and Weight Gain
    It is possible to experience weight gain while taking Prozac. This eMedTV article describes the clinical studies conducted on whether this drug can cause you to gain weight, and provides suggestions for helping with weight gain.
  • Prozac and Weight Loss
    There are many possible side effects of Prozac, and weight loss appears to be one of them. This eMedTV page explains that in clinical trials, 2 percent of patients experienced weight loss while taking Prozac.
  • Prozac Antidepressant
    Prozac is a medicine used for treating depression, panic disorder, OCD, and bulimia. This eMedTV article covers other uses of the antidepressant, describes how Prozac works, and explains what side effects may occur with treatment.
  • Prozac Capsules
    Available in liquid or capsule form, Prozac is a drug that is used to treat depression and other conditions. This eMedTV article explains when and how to take Prozac, explores what this drug is used for, and describes the effects of this medicine.
  • Prozac Dangers
    Prozac is an antidepressant that can increase the risk of suicidal thinking or behavior. This page from the eMedTV Web site explores other potential dangers of Prozac and lists some of the most common side effects that have been reported with this drug.
  • Prozac Dosage
    For the treatment of depression or OCD, the recommended starting Prozac dosage is 20 mg once a day. This eMedTV segment also provides dosing guidelines for bulimia and panic disorder treatment and offers tips for those taking the antidepressant.
  • Prozac Drug Information
    Prozac is a prescription medication used to treat depression, OCD, panic disorder, and bulimia. This eMedTV article provides more drug information on Prozac, including potential side effects of the medicine and important warnings and precautions.
  • Prozac Drug Interactions
    As this eMedTV page explains, drug interactions may occur if Prozac is taken with aspirin, digoxin, or NSAIDs. This resource offers a more complete list of drugs that may cause interactions with the antidepressant and describes the possible complications.
  • Prozac Drug Side Effects
    Some of the potential side effects of Prozac may include headaches, insomnia, and nausea. This eMedTV Web resource describes other possible Prozac drug side effects, including potentially serious side effects that require immediate medical care.
  • Prozac for Bulimia
    As this eMedTV segment explains, bulimia is sometimes treated with Prozac. This article describes how Prozac works for this condition and explains whether this medication is approved for use in children.
  • Prozac for Children
    This selection from the eMedTV Web site explains the benefits of using Prozac for children who have depression and OCD. This page describes how Prozac can help treat these conditions by affecting the levels of a specific brain chemical.
  • Prozac for Depression
    Both adults and children with depression may benefit from Prozac. This eMedTV Web page explores other Prozac uses, describes how the antidepressant works, and explains what you should discuss with your healthcare provider before starting treatment.
  • Prozac for Panic Disorders
    As this eMedTV article explains, panic disorders can be treated with Prozac. This resource explains why doctors often recommend antidepressants for panic disorders and discusses the use of this medication in children.
  • Prozac Indications
    As this eMedTV page discusses, Prozac is a prescription medication used to treat several conditions, such as depression, bulimia, and OCD. This page takes a closer look at Prozac indications, including off-label uses of the drug.
  • Prozac Information
    A prescription medicine, Prozac is approved for the treatment of depression and several other conditions. This eMedTV page gives some basic information on Prozac, including what to discuss with your healthcare provider before starting treatment.
  • Prozac Medication
    A prescription medication, Prozac is part of a class of drugs called SSRIs and is used to treat depression. This eMedTV page lists other uses, describes how the drug works, and explains what you should review with your doctor before taking this medicine.
  • Prozac Medicine for OCD
    Prozac is a prescription drug used for treating certain conditions within the brain, such as OCD. This eMedTV Web page explores the benefits of using this medicine for OCD and discusses the use of Prozac in children.
  • Prozac Oral
    An oral medication, Prozac is a prescription drug used for treating depression and other conditions. As this eMedTV page explains, it is available in capsule and liquid form. This article also covers other Prozac uses and explains how the drug works.
  • Prozac Overdose
    Nausea, drowsiness, and seizures are some of the most common Prozac overdose symptoms. This eMedTV Web page lists other possible signs of a Prozac overdose and describes the steps that may be taken to treat an overdose.
  • Prozac Risks
    Prozac could cause nausea, indigestion, and weakness. As this eMedTV page explains, there are many other risks to be aware of before starting Prozac. This article lists some of the more severe problems that may occur with this drug.
  • Prozac Safety
    As this eMedTV article explains, you may not be able to take Prozac safely if you have certain medical conditions, such as epilepsy or diabetes. This page further discusses other Prozac safety precautions, including possible side effects of the drug.
  • Prozac Sexual Side Effects
    As this eMedTV selection explains, sexual side effects (such as impotence or decreased libido) may occur in people taking Prozac. This article describes other possible sexual side effects of Prozac and explains how frequently these problems are reported.
  • Prozac Side Effects
    Headache, nausea, and insomnia are the most commonly reported side effects of Prozac. This eMedTV page describes other common side effects of the medication and also covers the more serious side effects requiring medical attention.
  • Prozac Substitute
    You may want to consider a substitute for Prozac if you do not respond well to this medication. As this eMedTV page explains, there are many alternatives to Prozac for treating depression, including other antidepressants and various types of therapy.
  • Prozac Tablets
    Prozac comes in liquid and capsule form. As this eMedTV page explains, the drug isn't available as a tablet. This article discusses what Prozac is used for, describes the effects of this antidepressant, and lists some of its potential side effects.
  • Prozac Uses
    Prozac is used for the treatment of depression, bulimia, OCD, and panic disorder. This eMedTV Web page describes these Prozac uses in more detail, discusses age requirements for this drug, and lists possible off-label uses.
  • Prozac Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV segment contains several Prozac warnings and precautions, such as being aware of drug interactions, looking for signs of an allergic reaction, and understanding the possible risks of taking the drug during pregnancy.
  • Prozac Weekly
    This eMedTV page offers an overview of Prozac Weekly, a long-acting version of Prozac. This article also covers the effectiveness of this drug for treating various conditions, including depression. A link to more information is also included.
  • Prozac Weight Change
    There are several possible side effects of Prozac, and weight change is one of them. This page from the eMedTV Web library explains how Prozac may cause weight loss or weight gain in some people, and offers tips on controlling your weight change.
  • Prozac Withdraw
    Stopping Prozac too quickly may lead to withdrawal symptoms, such as confusion and a burning sensation. This eMedTV page describes other possible Prozac withdrawal symptoms. Prozac withdraw is a common misspelling of Prozac withdrawal.
  • Prozac Withdrawal
    When Prozac withdrawal symptoms occur, they usually improve with time and don't require treatment. This eMedTV Web page lists possible withdrawal symptoms and explains what doctors may do to help prevent them from occurring.
  • Prozac Withdrawl
    Stopping Prozac too quickly may lead to withdrawal symptoms, such as confusion and headaches. This eMedTV page describes other possible Prozac withdrawal symptoms. Prozac withdrawl is a common misspelling of Prozac withdrawal.
  • Prozack
    Prozac, an antidepressant available by prescription, is used to treat depression, OCD, and panic disorder. This eMedTV page briefly describes this medication, including how it works and possible side effects. Prozack is a common misspelling of Prozac.
  • Prozak
    Prozac is a drug that is used to treat depression and certain other conditions. This eMedTV page lists other conditions that can be treated with Prozac and describes possible side effects to look out for. Prozak is a common misspelling of Prozac.
  • Prozax
    Prozac is a prescription medicine that is licensed to treat depression, OCD, panic disorder, and bulimia. This eMedTV resource explains how Prozac works, and describes possible signs of an overdose. Prozax is a common misspelling of Prozac.
  • Prozzak
    This eMedTV article explains that Prozac is approved to treat several conditions, including depression, panic disorder, OCD, and bulimia. This page also provides some dosing tips and possible side effects. Prozzak is a common misspelling of Prozac.
  • Psychotherapy for Depression
    This eMedTV article describes how psychotherapy can be used to treat depression. It covers the research that has been done on this topic and explains how this type of treatment can help change the negative thinking that often accompanies depression.
  • Pyroxidine
    Paroxetine is a drug that is licensed to treat several conditions, such as depression and anxiety. This eMedTV page covers how paroxetine works and describes other conditions it is approved to treat. Pyroxidine is a common misspelling of paroxetine.
  • Ramarin
    Remeron is a prescription medication that is licensed to treat depression. This selection from the eMedTV Web site describes Remeron in more detail and offers some general precautions for taking the drug. Ramarin is a common misspelling of Remeron.
  • Remaron
    This eMedTV resource explains how Remeron works to treat depression by balancing certain chemicals in the brain and highlights alternatives for the drug, such as other medicines or therapy. Remaron is a common misspelling of Remeron.
  • Remeran
    Remeron is a prescription drug typically used to treat depression in adults. This portion of the eMedTV library explains how it works, lists potential side effects, and offers dosage information. Remeran is a common misspelling of Remeron.
  • Remeran Side Effects
    Common Remeron side effects may include dry mouth, an increased appetite, or drowsiness. This eMedTV article also lists some of the more serious and rare side effects of the drug. Remeran side effects is a common misspelling of Remeron side effects.
  • Remeron
    Remeron is a prescription medication that is approved to help treat depression. This eMedTV article explains how the medication works, highlights some of its potential side effects, and offers tips on when and how to take the medication.
  • Remeron (Mirtazapine)
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, Remeron (mirtazapine) is a type of antidepressant. This article gives a brief overview of this drug, exploring the forms in which it is available and some of the most common side effects.
  • Remeron Alternatives
    If Remeron is causing side effects or is not working as well as intended, other options are available. This eMedTV article describes several Remeron alternatives, such as other antidepressants, behavioral therapy, and electroconvulsive therapy.
  • Remeron and Alcohol
    Because Remeron and alcohol affect similar brain chemicals, mixing the two may increase depression symptoms. This eMedTV resource offers precautions for drinking alcohol with Remeron and explains how physicians define moderate drinking.
  • Remeron and Breastfeeding
    Remeron may pass through your breast milk to your nursing infant. This eMedTV article explains the research that has been conducted on Remeron and breastfeeding, and describes what to do if you are prescribed the drug and plan to breastfeed.
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